top of page

How To Use Profit Target & Stop Loss In Trading

Stock Trading Strategies

Profit target and stop loss are risk management tools that can be used by traders to limit their potential losses and maximize their profits.

A profit target is a predetermined level at which a trader will exit a trade in order to realize a profit. This can be based on technical analysis, such as a resistance level or a moving average, or it can be based on fundamental analysis, such as a company's earnings or sales data.

A stop loss is a predetermined level at which a trader will exit a trade in order to limit potential losses. This is often used as a risk management tool to prevent the trade from becoming too costly if the market moves against the trader's position.

To use profit target and stop loss effectively, traders should first determine their risk tolerance and the level of potential loss they are willing to accept on a trade. They can then set their profit target and stop loss levels accordingly. For example, if a trader is willing to accept a potential loss of $100 on a trade, they could set a stop loss at $100 below their entry price. Similarly, if the trader has a profit target of $200, they could set a profit target at $200 above their entry price.

It's important to note that profit target and stop loss levels are not guaranteed and that market conditions can cause the price to move beyond these levels. As a result, traders should use these tools as part of a broader risk management strategy and be prepared to adjust their levels as needed.


One thing that many people may not know about profit targets and stop limits in trading is that they can be used in conjunction with one another to create a risk/reward ratio. This ratio is a measure of the potential profit compared to the potential loss on a trade, and can be used to help traders make more informed decisions about their trades.

For example, if a trader has a profit target of $200 and a stop loss of $100, they have a risk/reward ratio of 2:1. This means that for every $1 of potential loss, the trader has the opportunity to make $2 in profit. Traders can use this ratio to help them determine the trade-off between the potential profit and risk of a trade.

It's worth noting, however, that the risk/reward ratio is not a guarantee of success and that market conditions can cause the price to move beyond the profit target or stop loss levels. As a result, traders should use this ratio as just one part of their overall trading strategy and be prepared to adjust their profit targets and stop limits as needed.

Join our Community with over 17,000 active traders. Our team posts thousands of trading ideas daily covering both interday and intraday trading opportunities. Useful Links | How To Trade What Is Position Sizing When Trading? Is It Effective? What Is Efficient Frontier? Does It Improve Portfolio Performance? What Are Volume Indicators (VWAP, OBV, CMF) for Stock Trading? What Are Volatility Indicators (ATR, Bollinger Bands, Standard Deviation)? What Are Scale-Invariant Momentum Indicators? What Are Momentum Indicators? What Are Trend Indicators? What Is Options Open Interest? What Is The Difference Between Market Depth and Level 2 Data? How To Use Market Depth For Trading Stocks? What Is A Robo-Advisor? What Is Trading Profit Factor? How To Use Profit Target & Stop Loss In Trading? What's Heikin-Ashi & How To Use In Trading? What Is Algorithmic Trading? How To Use Resistance & Support Lines For Trading?